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Wednesday, June 1, 2016

Free Mosquito Prevention To Be Distributed

Fairhope, Alabama

"Yellow Fever" mosquito


"Asian Tiger" mosquito

 ZIKA VIRUS A NEW THREAT

For those worried about mosquito-borne diseases like the new Zika virus, larvicide tablets will be given away at no charge on June 14th.

The tablets may be put in standing water to prevent breeding of the two mosquitoes in the area known to carry diseases.

Spraying continues as well in city neighborhoods on trash-pickup days in the evenings; a benign type of natural cedar oil is being used.

Zika can cause birth defects and other illnesses.


CITY OF FAIRHOPE & BALDWIN COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT TO DISTRIBUTE LARVICIDE TABLETS IN FAIRHOPE TO COMBAT MOSQUITOES ENCOURAGES RESIDENTS TO CHECK AREAS FOR STANDING WATER SOURCES

On Tuesday, June 14th, the City of Fairhope will hold a larvicide tablet (Larvicides are used in breeding sites (water) to kill larvae before they emerge as adults) distribution in conjunction with the Baldwin County Health Department to combat mosquitoes in our area. 

The distribution will be held from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Fairhope Civic Center. For folks who cannot make it on the 14th, they can pick-up tablets at the City warehouse Monday through Friday from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m.
The City is continuing to spray in residential areas and around the parks nightly to also help control mosquitoes. 

To report an area that needs to be sprayed, residents should call, 251-928-8003. Residents may also request for areas near their homes not to be sprayed by calling the same number.

Residents are also encouraged to make sure that mosquitoes don't have a place to lay their eggs by eliminating any standing water sources around their homes. Because mosquitoes need water for two stages of their life cycle, it's important to monitor standing water sources.
  • Get rid of standing water in rain gutters, old tires, buckets, plastic covers, toys or any other container where mosquitoes can breed.
  • Empty and change the water in bird baths, fountains, wading pools, rain barrels and potted plant trays at least once a week to eliminate potential mosquito habitats.
  • Drain temporary pools of water or fill with dirt.
  • Keep swimming pool water treated and circulating.
You can also use the following tips to help protect yourself from exposure to mosquitoes.
  • Use EPA-registered mosquito repellents when necessary and follow label directions and precautions closely.
  • Tuck shirts into pants and pants into socks to cover gaps in your clothing where mosquitoes can get to your skin.
  • Use head nets, long sleeves and long pants if you venture into areas with high mosquito populations, such as salt marshes.
  • Stay indoors at sunrise, sunset and early in the evening when mosquitoes are most active, especially if there is a mosquito-borne disease warning in effect.
  • Replace your outdoor lights with yellow "bug" lights, which tend to attract fewer mosquitoes than ordinary lights. The yellow lights are NOT repellents, however.
Use structural barriers
  • Cover all gaps in walls, doors and windows to prevent mosquitoes from entering.
  • Make sure window and door screens are "bug tight."
  • Completely cover baby carriers and beds with netting.
 

For questions about mosquitoes, spraying or larvicide tablets, please call 251-928-8003.


Zika virus birth defect






3 comments:

Anonymous said...
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Anonymous said...

What about those giant mosquitos that sneak in the house all the time.

Anonymous said...

Those are crane flies. They do look like mosquitoes, but aren't anything like them.