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Sunday, April 5, 2015

Police Seek To Improve Public Trust/Respect

Fairhope, Alabama. (fairhopetimes@att.net)

COMMUNITY OUTREACH TO BEGIN
Chief Petties gets award

In the wake of recent well-publicized, racially-charged incidents in Ferguson Missouri, Madison Alabama and elsewhere, Fairhope Police Chief Joe Petties says his officers will be getting out in the community more to open up lines of communication and build 'public trust' -- to avoid such things here.

"The Chief from Madison noted that if he hadn’t worked hard before this incident to build up trust and respect in his community, it could have gotten out of hand. It’s important that police are trusted and are not seen as bullies in a community."

"Its important that police are trusted and not be seen as bullies in a community." 

Petties was cited by the Alabama Association of Chief's of Police last January for ongoing training he received to address such problems.  (full statement at bottom) 



(Publisher's note: Police officers are often associated with German Shepherd, Rottweiler, or other such breeds of dogs; but Petties comes home to his three Pomeranians every day instead.)


Chief Petties' dogs






Statement from the city:
 
FAIRHOPE -- Fairhope Chief of Police Joseph Petties has completed the first 40 hours of training in the Certified Law Enforcement Executive Program, conducted by the University Partnership for Alabama Continuing Education and the Alabama Association of Chiefs of Police. Chief Petties was recognized and awarded his certificate at the Alabama Association of Chiefs of Police Winter Conference in Montgomery in January 2015.
 
“As Chief, I’m required to take at least 20 executive-level hours every year, held in various cities around the state, and the classes have been useful and interesting,” Petties said. “I just took one class on enhancing the public trust, that brought us up to date on the situation in Ferguson, Missouri as well as the incident that occurred in Madison, Alabama, between the police officer and the elderly man from India. The Chief from Madison noted that if he hadn’t worked hard before this incident to build up trust and respect in his community, it could have gotten out of hand. It’s important that police are trusted and are not seen as bullies in a community.”
 
Petties said that he places great importance on communicating with the public and having a good relationship between the community and his officers. “You’re going to see officers out in the community more—getting involved with youth in a fun way, like playing basketball or other sports, and speaking at churches and other organizations to let people know more about the men and women of the Fairhope Police Department and what we do.”
 
Mayor Kant agreed. “Police shouldn’t be someone you only have contact with when there is a problem. We want our officers be part of the community on a daily basis so that people know them and trust them.”
 
Classes in the Executive-level continuing education program include Dealing Effectively with the External Environment, Effective Management and Supervisory Techniques, Diversity, Understanding People and Cultures, Strategic Planning, and Generational Differences and assessments.
 
 

7 comments:

Anonymous said...

I don't think those are pomeranians. But, whatever. Kudos to the Chief.

Anonymous said...

the two on the outside are pomeranians. the one on the inside is a yorkie-poo :)

Publisher said...

you are right, the one in the middle is a mix ...

Publisher said...

Some anonymous comments may not be published; use our Facebook account instead.

Anonymous said...

If they used your Facebook account, they wouldn't be able to stay anonymous. My mama says if you can't say anything good, don't say it at all.

Anonymous said...

Don't use facebook. Will just have to mind my manners, I guess

Publisher said...

We are well aware that most are reluctant to say what is really on their minds publicly because of inevitable ramifications from the community at large (not to mention government itself): they are very real and likely.

Unfortunately, in the absence of identification, the Publisher bears the brunt of it instead!