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Monday, November 30, 2015

Controversial Pine Forest Restoration Project Continues

Fairhope, Alabama





Councilman Burrell watched as Tree Committee member Patrick Waldrop supervised a controlled burn in Knoll Park recently: Waldrop is a retired state forester now living in Fairhope.

Waldrop had to wait for favorable dry weather conditions and an east wind to blow the smoke out over the bay, away from homes.

Periodic burning -- a component of the Management and Maintenance plans for the park unanimously approved by the city council last year (clk) -- is needed not so much for the trees themselves; but for the plant eco-system below them.

The restoration project was cited when the city won an Urban Forestry award at the 'America in Bloom' conference last September in Holland, Michigan (clk).

Old growth long leaf pine forests in the South were nearly wiped-out by commercial harvesting; but a conservation/restoration effort has emerged lately.

Fairhope Volunteer Fire Department personnel stood by as the Friends of Knoll Park (clk) organization assisted with the burning.

Burning is recommended every two or three years.

Knoll Park is named for early-resident George Knoll who lived nearby.














24 comments:

Anonymous said...

I so disagree with this for many reasons. One big one is the poor residents that have to breathe the smoke especially people with lung problems such as asthma and copd.

Anonymous said...

Surrounding residents were notified several days prior to the burn via door to door contact and no one expressed any objections.

Anonymous said...

The entire burn was over and done in about 30 minutes.

Anonymous said...

Ironically COPD is a smokers disease, trees promote asthma, so lets cut down the longest living residents of Fairhope in place of the whining transient citizens. Lets see who outlives who.

Anonymous said...

Burning is necessary. Maybe nearby residents could be taken out of the area during the burn. Surely, they are warned. Knoll Park preservation is an important need. The beautiful natural park proves there can be beauty without flowers

Anonymous said...

This is a shame.

A small group of liberal elitists who think they are smarter than the rest of us.

Anonymous said...

Wonderful job! Residents were notified, careful attention was paid to ensure winds kept the smoke predominantly over the bay, and a quick (30 minutes) turn around time ensured any possible inconveniences were minimal. I applaud those who have educated themselves and are working to ensure this valuable resource is preserved. The value to the community in terms of history, education and beauty is priceless. I encourage everyone to learn more about this treasure. Kudos.

Anonymous said...

I guess I am stupid too. I do not see how burning up the trees helps them.

Anonymous said...

I am educated and know that that smoke is an environmental pollutant.
I live near the park and was never notified.
The solution to anyone that defies the few towns elites is to criticize their intelligence.
Freedom of speech in the United States is protected by the First Amendment to the United States Constitution and by many state constitutions and state and federal laws.
Are you really sure you’re so smart?

firefighter314 said...

Here's how it helps:

Burning stimulates new grass growth that these and other animals use for nesting and hiding. It also retards the growth of brush and trees, which can overtake open areas and crowd out some animal and
plant species.

This burn was done with great oversight and care as not to cause too much inconvenience. I can't imagine anyone being overly bothered by it as prior notification was done, and this is for the good of the community of which we all share.

Anonymous said...

With the exception of one homeowner who was not there during notification or the burn, every homeowner adjacent to the park was notified in person. The ground winds and the upper level transport winds were both easterly the entire duration of the burn. Transport winds were 20 mph and mixing height was over 2000 feet. There were no homes that received any direct smoke at any time.

Anonymous said...

Thinned Skinned

Anonymous said...

oh hold on a minute to the person that said copd is a smokers disease . You need to get your D??? facts straight . MY father has copd and has never smoked a day in his life. What a dumbA?? you are The park is in city limits and there is suppose to be a law against burning in city limits . Oh but I guess that does not apply to Fairhope just the residents. Fairhope is a so called tourist town and what a better way to greet guest than smoke in your face. As far as the burn lasting 30 min , well the smell last for days!!!

Anonymous said...

The burning in no way is good for the grass or animals this is VERY OLD SCHOOL! TYPICAL FAIRHOPE OLD SCHOOL WAY OF LIFE!

Anonymous said...

yes and by the way I am a republican to the above person ("liberal elitist")

I do not understand how this has anything to do with political parties but we are talking about Alabama

Anonymous said...

Well done. I can hardly wait to see it in the spring. Thank you guys and gals. Good job!!

Anonymous said...

There is always going to be someone to complain, whether it is right or wrong.

Anonymous said...

Why is it complaining when someone does not agree It is a very old way that is no longer used except where there is big forestry and a chance for wildfire. Today it is not used to promote nitrogen in fact studies show it is bad for grass and trees but y'all stay outdated and fight with people that do not agree with you. Roll tide ha ha

Anonymous said...

Oooh yeah I can't wait to see how that burnt tree does

Publisher said...

Please avoid personal attacks or repetitive posting.

Anonymous said...

I'm not sure what your source is. All the current research literature I've read refers to fire SUPPRESSION policies as being harmful and outdated. Especially in reference to long leaf pine forests.

Anonymous said...

Yes, your right pine trees LOVE their bark and feeder roots burned!! Seems to me it was not so controlled as some looked burned all the way up.

Anonymous said...

turpentine comes from pine needles.. just saying

Anonymous said...

Here is a link to a wonderful documentary on the longleaf pine. This is the trailer for the show. A nice summary

http://longleafpine.org/