Translate

Tuesday, June 7, 2016

Updated: Fairhope 'Air Raid' Siren To Wail Again

Fairhope, Alabama

UPDATED: TEST DELAYED

 
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 7, 2016
Contact: Sherry Sullivan, 251-990-0218
 
FAIRHOPE TO TEST WEATHER SIREN ON TUESDAY, JUNE 14
 
FAIRHOPE -- The City of Fairhope will test its weather siren next Tuesday, June 14 at 6:30 p.m. The siren is located in downtown Fairhope near the Welcome Center and should be audible up to a half a mile.
 
After the initial test, the weather siren will be tested the first Tuesday of every month at 6:30 p.m. The siren will be sounded for a tornado warning or a severe thunderstorm warning with winds in excess of 60 MPH.
 
For questions, contact John Saraceno, City of Fairhope Emergency Operations Manager at 251-928-8003.
 



siren located behind welcome center



TEST TODAY AT 6PM

The siren that was used for many years to alert the community to fires and other emergencies may make a comeback, this time as a severe weather warning for the downtown area, especially during special events.

Wind gusts of over 60 mph will precipitate the alarm to encourage downtown pedestrians to take cover, but it could be used for other emergencies as well.

The comeback was precipitated by a storm that damaged several tents set up the evening before the last Arts and Crafts Festival in March, according to the city's EMA manager John Saraceno.

The siren will be controlled from police dispatch; a new weather-monitoring station may be installed near the bay as well.

The alarm is good for about a half mile; if successful, more sirens could be installed elsewhere in town.

According to town historian Donnie Barrett, it was installed at its present location in 1977 and was always referred to as the "air raid siren" by locals.

5 comments:

Anonymous said...

Sounds like a winner.

Hank said...

We lived 3 miles from it and could hear it back when it was used for fire alerting. I'm glad to see it back in use for the public's benefit.

Anonymous said...

We do not need any mor noise pollution, enough spurious alarms go off already. Scare me to death.

Anonymous said...

This is not necessary today when everybody has a smart phone.

Hank said...

Not everyone has smart phones. And this will be critical if and when cell service is lost or non existent. Then what will you do? A system like this exists in many communities nationwide. It's a welcome start. It will be less "noise pollution" than there was in decades past since the fire department no longer uses it.